EU rules provide for greater protection for gig workers

The European Parliament has approved new EU rules aimed at providing greater protections for gig economy workers.

The BBC reports the new rules, which apply to those in ‘on-demand’ jobs working at least three hours a week (averaged over four weeks) at employers such Uber or Deliveroo, as well as trainees and apprentices working in similar circumstances, will require employers to inform all workers about ‘essential aspects’ of their employment on their first day, including:

  • Description of their work duties
  • Start date and pay information
  • Indication of what a standard working day entails, or reference hours
  • Right to compensation for late cancelling of shift
  • Just one probationary period, lasting six months at most
  • The enabling of employees to have other jobs, preventing ‘exclusivity clauses’.

Member states now have a maximum of three years to enforce the new rules, while the UK will only be obliged to implement the law if it is still a member state of the EU three years after the new regulation enters into force.

However, the UK has already introduced similar rules at a national level after government acted on recommendations in the Taylor Review in its Good Work Plan.

• Comment below on this story. You can also tweet us to tell us your thoughts or share this story with a friend. Our editorial email is recruiter.editorial@redactive.co.uk

Recruiters back single new body to protect workers’ employment rights

Recruiters have given their backing to government proposals for single labour market enforcement body to improve enforcement of employment rights for workers and businesses.

Legislation 18 July 2019

Consultation on single body to improve workers’ rights

The government has announced a consultation on proposals to create a single labour market enforcement body to improve enforcement of employment rights for workers and businesses.

Legislation 17 July 2019

Full Strength campaign calls for reforms to overseas workers regulations

Recruitment organisations are among a coalition of bodies that have joined together in a campaign aimed at the next prime minister to avoid a skills disaster.

Legislation 17 July 2019

Amazon upskills US workers despite risk of leaving for new careers

Amazon has made a $700m (£563m) investment in upskilling its US workforce and is prepared to risk these workers leaving to progress their careers elsewhere.

17 July 2019
Top